How Radon Enters Your Home

How Radon Enters Your Home

 

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water.  Air pressure inside your home is usually lower than pressure in the soil around your home’s foundation.  Because of this difference in pressure, your house acts like a vacuum, dragging radon in through foundation cracks and other openings.  Radon may also be present in well water and small amounts can be released into the air in your home when water is used for showering and household uses.

 

Radon Reduction Techniques Work

 

Some radon reduction systems can reduce radon levels in your home by up to 99%.  The cost of fixing a home generally ranges from $1200.00 and up, depending on the size of fan that is required, the amount of piping required and soil conditions around your home.

 

Did You Know?

Radon:  The House of Representatives

 

The radon bill from last year passed out of the House of Representatives on Tuesday by a vote of 99-1. The bill was amended and now requires the Department of Education to send a letter on the risk associated with radon, including but not limited to, information on radon testing and mitigation, relevant statistically data, and the funding sources available to all public and nonpublic schools. School districts will then have to report back to the department if they have a radon testing and mitigation plan in place.  The information will then be shared to the legislature by January 1, 2015.  

The bill now moves to the Senate where they can either concur with the House version or insist on their version. If the Senate concurs, the bill will go to the governor; if they insist on their version it will go to a conference committee for further negotiations.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was awarded nearly $10.5 million in grants designed to protect children and other vulnerable groups from health hazards in their homes.  This funding highlights the link between housing and health and develops cost effective methods for mitigation residential hazards.  HUD’s grants are being awarded to academic and non-profit research institutions studying new methods to recognize and control residential health and safety hazards such as asthma triggers, bed bugs, mold and radon