Radon Risk If You Smoke

Radon Risk If You Smoke

 

Radon Level

If 1,000 people who smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...

The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...

WHAT TO DO:
Stop smoking and...

20 pCi/L

About 260 people could get lung cancer

250 times the risk of drowning

Fix your home

10 pCi/L

About 150 people could get lung cancer

200 times the risk of dying in a home fire

Fix your home

8 pCi/L

About 120 people could get lung cancer

30 times the risk of dying in a fall

Fix your home

4 pCi/L

About 62 people could get lung cancer

5 times the risk of dying in a car crash

Fix your home

2 pCi/L

About 32 people could get lung cancer

6 times the risk of dying from poison

Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L

About 20 people could get lung cancer

(Average indoor radon level)

(Reducing radon 
levels below 2 pCi/L is difficult.)

0.4 pCi/L

About 3 people could get lung cancer

(Average outdoor radon level)

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be lower.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports.

Radon Risk If You've Never Smoked

 

Radon Level

If 1,000 people who never smoked were exposed to this level over a lifetime*...

The risk of cancer from radon exposure compares to**...

WHAT TO DO:

20 pCi/L

About 36 people could get lung cancer

35 times the risk of drowning

Fix your home

10 pCi/L

About 18 people could get lung cancer

20 times the risk of dying in a home fire

Fix your home

8 pCi/L

About 15 people could get lung cancer

4 times the risk of dying in a fall

Fix your home

4 pCi/L

About 7 people could get lung cancer

The risk of dying in a car crash

Fix your home

2 pCi/L

About 4 person could get lung cancer

The risk of dying from poison

Consider fixing between 2 and 4 pCi/L

1.3 pCi/L

About 2 people could get lung cancer

(Average indoor radon level)

(Reducing radon levels below 
2 pCi/L is difficult.)

0.4 pCi/L

 

(Average outdoor radon level)

Note: If you are a former smoker, your risk may be higher.
* Lifetime risk of lung cancer deaths from EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes (EPA 402-R-03-003).
** Comparison data calculated using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 1999-2001 National Center for Injury Prevention and Control Reports

 

Did You Know?

All Children Deserve a Healthy Learning Environment

Children are inherently more vulnerable to environmental hazards because their bodies are still developing.  Substandard environmental conditions in schools, such as insufficient cleaning or inadequate ventilation, can cause serious health problems for children.  Evidence that indoor air quality directly impact health and student academic performance continues to mount.

Indoor air quality refers to those characteristics of the air in indoor environments, such as levels of radon, pollutants, humidity, temperature, etc., that impact the occupants’ health, comfort and ability to perform.