Risks of Radon

More Information AboutThe Risks of Radon

 

 

The EPA plans to furnish radon information, promote testing, increase awareness, and give to States technical and financial assistance.  The Director of the EPA Center for Radon and Air toxics (within the Indoor Environments Division) called the 2012 goal “very aggressive,” as it represents a tripling of the current number of mitigations and doubling current levels of new homes built with RRNC.  EPA estimated, based on risk assessments, that:

  • The estimated number of homes with radon-reducing features increased from 153,598 during 2000 to 193,996 during 2005.
  • The estimated number of lives saved from additional homes having radon reducing features increased from 369 during 2000 to 577 during 2005.
  • The projected number of lives saved from additional homes having radon-reducing features will increase from 645 during 2006 to 1,250 during 2012

Did You Know?

Radon:  The House of Representatives

 

The radon bill from last year passed out of the House of Representatives on Tuesday by a vote of 99-1. The bill was amended and now requires the Department of Education to send a letter on the risk associated with radon, including but not limited to, information on radon testing and mitigation, relevant statistically data, and the funding sources available to all public and nonpublic schools. School districts will then have to report back to the department if they have a radon testing and mitigation plan in place.  The information will then be shared to the legislature by January 1, 2015.  

The bill now moves to the Senate where they can either concur with the House version or insist on their version. If the Senate concurs, the bill will go to the governor; if they insist on their version it will go to a conference committee for further negotiations.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) was awarded nearly $10.5 million in grants designed to protect children and other vulnerable groups from health hazards in their homes.  This funding highlights the link between housing and health and develops cost effective methods for mitigation residential hazards.  HUD’s grants are being awarded to academic and non-profit research institutions studying new methods to recognize and control residential health and safety hazards such as asthma triggers, bed bugs, mold and radon